When people find out you live full-time in an RV they are usually horrified or delighted.  Apathy just isn’t a normal reaction about the situation.  After people get to know you for a few weeks or even months, then the questions slowly start being asked.

What is the bathroom situation? How do you live in a such a small space? What about tornadoes? How do you stay warm or cool?

Some even begin to consider trying out the lifestyle themselves.

Wanna-be tiny house dwellers think about the delights of freedom, the joys of conservation and being in nature, and enchantment of something new.

Wanna-be tiny house dwellers also ponder the troubles: emptying a poop tank, keeping track of power and water, and dealing with a cold house in the winter.

These of course are not even real problems.

The problem that holds back most people from any kind of alternative lifestyle is fear.

If you spend your money on a car your friends like, a house your parents like, and clothes your co-workers like, then how could you possibly have the courage to embrace a lifestyle that people do not understand?

I see more people reject any kind of dream chasing over the issue of fear of rejection.  Many people are ultimately just afraid of what others will say. 

What will your co-works say if you wear the same clothes all the time?  What will your family say about your inability to have a guest room for them?  What will your friends think if your lifestyle exposes their excess extravagance?

Ultimately living in a tiny home makes you confront yourself.  If you live in a tiny house you have to confront personality conflicts.  You cant all run to a different room.  You cant worry about your friends and neighbors.  You have to buy clothes that work and are tough because of your tiny closets.  You have to buy a gigantic truck to tow your trailer, and you may get sneered at for your miles per gallon.

If you are going to live in a tiny house or RV you have to be willing to not care what others think about it.  You have to be ok with people making fun of your lifestyle and clothes.  You have to be ok not being normal.

If you live in a tiny house, everything from your car, to your entertainment, to your hobbies all have to fit into a model of sustainability and portableness.  Everything has to be filtered to fit into your new life.

Once you can do that, you can finally start living life to its fullest.  You can finally start looking at problems with a new perspective, and you can finally start finding new solutions.  Solutions not based in fear.  Solutions based on a reality that is achieved only when you quit looking through a filtered lens tinted by fear.

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The Biggest Hurdle to Full-Time RV Living
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If you spend your money on a car your friends like, a house your parents like, and clothes your co-workers like, then how could you possibly have the courage to embrace a lifestyle that people do not understand?
Brent Homer
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